Horse Taxidermy

Let’s Discuss: Horse Taxidermy

Last Updated on March 26, 2022 by Allison Price

Although taxidermy is a practice that has existed for centuries, people have only recently started to take their horses after they die and immortalize them in lifelike mounts in order to preserve the memories for many decades.

Many horses of historical importance were mounted. Their hides were preserved and stretched over fiberglass frames. They were then carefully placed in lifelike positions. These museum pieces include Misty of Chincoteague, Napoleon’s last horse Le Vizir and Comanche, who are both pictured.

A somewhat less-impressive-looking Comanche, the only survivor of the Battle of Little Bighorn, now on display at the University of Kansas Natural History Museum. Wikimedia Commons/GorianEmpathy/CC

Horse Taxidermy

We’re not talking about horses from the past, we’re just talking about everyday horses. Some of these horses may have been show-ring stars, but they are not museum worthy. They are preserved for posterity. You can do a quick Google search on “equine taxidermy” to find both the museum pieces and plenty of professionals who are available for your service.

Taxidermied is a way to get your horse bonded (we’re going say that’s a term now). You need to really love your horse — soul mate level — as prices start at $3,000 to mount a shoulder and $6,000 to mount the entire body. This price is for a small horse. The prices double when you buy the draft-sized big guys. The Budweiser horse team would allow the taxidermist to retire in style.

This art is not for the feint of heart but it’s a great conversation starter for awkward family gatherings. Horse Nation, weigh in — Would you ever consider having a mount made from your horse in order to keep his likeness forever?

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