Bareback Pads with stirrups

Beware of Bareback Pads with stirrups

Last Updated on March 11, 2022 by Allison Price

If you add stirrups on a structure without a tree or spinal channel, it is easy for the pad slip when the rider becomes unbalanced and places more weight in one stirrup.
This can lead to serious injuries if the rider gets caught in the stirrup. Even worse, if they do fall, the pad and stirrups are flapping underneath the horse’s head to scare them.

Permanent damage can be done to your horse’s spine by the stirrup or girth attachment. There is no channel or tree to alleviate that pressure.
Even the padded neoprene ‘bareback’ saddles will put concentrated pressure on the horse’s backbone if used for any length.

Bareback pads are not meant to replace saddles. A girth strap should not be extended over the back as it can cause damage to the spine.
This forum post and this blog show some examples of the problems that poorly designed bareback pads can cause.img alt=”The Best Bareback Pad. 

 Bareback Pads with stirrups

If you are looking for a bareback pad that will give you maximum grip, you should choose a sheepskin or suede type.
To relieve pressure, it is advisable to choose a pad without girthing straps over the backbone ( such as the Best Bareback pad) or to use a Treeless saddle pad (has spine clearing channel) underneath.

Bareback riding is a great way to get an independent seat. A bareback pad can help you in the beginning stages of your ride and will keep you clean.

A bareback pad can be a big advantage for horses, as it allows for a wider girth and doesn’t dig into your seat bones, especially if you are riding bareback for a long time (15 minutes or more).
To feel the sensation, place your hand underneath your horse’s seat bones. If you don’t have much padding, your horse will probably appreciate a good bareback pad.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top